Copyright 2017 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

deadline: October 1, 2017

Editors Gregory J. Hampton (Howard University) and Kendra R. Parker (Hope College) are seeking submissions for The Bloomsbury Companion to Octavia E. Butler. This book will be a collection of literary criticism and theory by an international range of contemporary scholars exploring major themes across the full span of Octavia Butler’s writing.  

Weiterlesen: Octavia Butler Companion

Shakespeare and Science Fiction

The Anglia Ruskin Centre for Science Fiction and Fantasy (CSFF)
Anglia Ruskin University
28 April, 2018

Deadline: 6 October 2017

Weiterlesen: Shakespeare and Science Fiction

CfP: “200 Years of the Fantastic: Celebrating Frankenstein and Mary Shelley,” ICFA 39, March 14-18, 2018

Please join us for ICFA 39, March 14-18, 2018, when our theme will be “200 Years of the Fantastic: Celebrating Frankenstein and Mary Shelley.”

Deadline: October 31, 2017

We welcome papers on the work of: Guest of Honor John Kessel (Nebula, Locus and Tiptree Award winner), Guest of Honor Nike Sulway (Tiptree and Queensland award winner; nominee for Aurealis and Crawford awards), and Guest Scholar Fred Botting (Professor, Kingston University London; author of Making Monstrous: “Frankenstein”, Criticism, Theory; Gothic; and Limits of Horror).

Weiterlesen: “200 Years of the Fantastic: Celebrating Frankenstein and Mary Shelley,” ICFA 39, March 14-18, 2018

Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science Fiction

 Date: Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Location: New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Namm N119, Brooklyn, NY

Deadline: Oct. 31, 2017

Weiterlesen: Extrapolation, Interdisciplinarity, and Learning: The Second Annual City Tech Symposium on Science...

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Afrofuturism

The Journal of Science Fiction is accepting submissions for a special issue on Afrofuturism to be published on January 31, 2018.

deadline: October 9, 2017

Weiterlesen: Call for Papers: Special Issue on Afrofuturism

Call for Papers: Monsters and Monstrosity
A Special Issue of The Popular Culture Studies Journal
Guest Editor: Bernadette Marie Calafell, University of Denver

Deadline: December 1, 2017

Scholars, such as W. Scott Poole and Kendall Phillips, have argued that monsters, particularly those in horror, reflect or correspond to the cultural anxieties of a society. These cultural anxieties are often connected to struggles for power around race, class, gender, sexuality, and ability. Thus, historical context and power are central to studies of monstrosity. Given that we are immersed in what may be considered a horror renaissance, both in film and television, increasing violence against people of color in the U.S., and dangerous and toxic performances of white femininity and masculinity, this is a ripe moment to explore the relationship between monstrosity and popular culture, both literally and figuratively. Thus, this special issues solicits manuscripts that take interdisciplinary approaches to explore the theoretical and methodological possibilities of monstrosity. What can employing monstrosity as a theoretical framework or analytical tool contribute to the study of popular culture? Key questions driving this special issue include: What can monstrosity teach us about Otherness? How can it be used resistively? Conversely, how can monstrosity be used as a tool of oppression? In what ways we can be unpack figures, such as Donald Trump, through the lens of monstrosity? What constitutes monstrosity? How might we understand history differently through the construct of monstrosity? What are the necessary future directions for the study of monstrosity and popular culture? Critical rhetorical, critical qualitative (including critical auto-methodologies), and performative approaches to monstrosity are welcomed.

Weiterlesen: Call for Papers: Monsters and Monstrosity A Special Issue of The Popular Culture Studies Journal

CfP: Gothic Animals: Uncanny Otherness and the Animal With-Out (edited collection)

deadline: November 1, 2017

 ‘The boundary between the animal and the human has long been unstable, especially since the Victorian period. Where the boundary is drawn between human and animal is itself an expression of political power and dominance, and the ‘animal’ can at once express the deepest fears and greatest aspirations of a society’ (Victorian Animal Dreams, 4).

‘The animal, like the ghost or good or evil spirit with which it is often associated, has been a manifestation of the uncanny’ (Timothy Clark, 185).

In the mid nineteenth-century Charles Darwin published his theories of evolution. And as Deborah Denenholz Morse and Martin A. Danahay suggest, ‘The effect of Darwin’s ideas was both to make the human more animal and the animal more human, destabilizing boundaries in both directions’ (Victorian Animal Dreams, 2). Nineteenth-century fiction quickly picked up on the idea of the ‘animal within’ with texts like R.L. Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and H. G. Wells’s The Island of Doctor Moreau. In these novels the fear explored was of an unruly, defiant, degenerate and entirely amoral animality lying (mostly) dormant within all of us. This was our animal-other associated with the id: passions, appetites and capable of a complete disregard for all taboos and any restraint. As Cyndy Hendershot states, this ‘animal within’ ‘threatened to usurp masculine rationality and return man to a state of irrational chaos’ (The Animal Within, 97). This however, relates the animal to the human in a very specific, anthropocentric way. Non-humans and humans have other sorts of encounters too, and even before Darwin humans have often had an uneasy relationship with animals. Rats, horses, dogs, cats, birds and other beasts have, as Donna Haraway puts it a way of ‘looking back’ at us (When Species Meet,19).

Weiterlesen: CfP: Gothic Animals: Uncanny Otherness and the Animal With-Out (edited collection)

ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual Culture

Deadline: 15 November 2017

Department of American Literature and Culture, in cooperation with the Video Game Research Center, is organizing a two-day international conference “ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual Culture.” We seek proposals for papers and panels that focus on the topic of exhaustion and regeneration in American and Canadian literature and visual culture (film, visual arts, video games, television, and others) of the last seventeen years, from the year 2000 to the present day.

Weiterlesen: ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual...

CfP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The University of Northampton UK

deadline: October 8, 2017

 

From JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, Young Adult (YA) narratives have grown exponentially over the past twenty years. Adopting a range of genres and platforms including the Bildungsroman and the coming of age teen drama, YA narratives represent a significant cultural means to explore the formation of identity in all its varied aspects. This one day symposium at the University of Northampton will investigate the representation of identity constructions in relation to narrative form in YA narratives both past and present.

Weiterlesen: CfP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The...